• For those that are or may be expiriencing login issues, please try using https://www.ohgunowners.net

    That seems to resolve the problem some have been having.

    Also if you'd like to use the secure connection obviously you can with out problem.

    If you do have any issues please use the contact link at the bottom to let me know so I can look further into it.

    Thank you,

    Andy

Any IDPA shooters here?

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
I have found that a lot of the newer people to the shooting sports have a "training" mindset that says if something happens to the gun during the course of fire, that you just stop and call a halt. Pretty much every bit of government training (local and Federal) that I've done worked that way. Stop, put up your hand and wait for RO intervention.

This works good in the military where safety is paramount. And it's normal and expected while training.

This works at civilian ranges, both indoor and outdoor where a malfunction happens and the shooter just stops and waits for the RO.

However, it is stressed during the initial briefing here that once the buzzer goes off, you're in it "for real".

I've had several new shooters, mostly military and police academy trained who will just stop in the middle of a stage when something happens to their sidearm. FTF. FTE, some type of slide problem. Misfire, etc.

Once I explain to them that they're still in the fight and on the clock, they kind of "GET IT" that you can't really stop!

Obviously if the SO (me) hears a squib load, I can call a STOP immediately, but for pretty much everything else, you're in the fight to the end!!

Train like you mean it, even if it's only a game. You WILL revert back to what you're used to in a panic situation. This is a proven fact.

AD (in my panic mode, I revert back to margaritas!)
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
All,

Well, this should be interesting.

I thrown down the "BUG" challenge to our entire shooting group. In the last mass email with the posted scores, I made mention of an upcoming "special" session for the Monday night group that we would have one squad made up of all the BUG (Back Up Gun) shooters using the rules for that division.

Yes, it's time to drag out the old 38 snubby from under the towels in the desk or that LC9 hanging off the bed post and see if you can actually use it for one night. The gauntlet was thrown down.

So far I've got at least 5 guys who said they'll run with their back up gun on Monday and a few more who are searching for a sidearm to borrow to run in BUG. Me? I'll be shooting the trusty Glock 26 in 9mm. Got a good buddy shooting a Glock 27 and one other shooting a Glock 26. His wife may even bring hers!

So, we'll run the stages on Monday with everybody else, just six bullets at a time in the magazines (or revolver) with a lot of reloads on the clock. I've been practicing in the bedroom (reloads, not that other stuff) and my right hand is sore (from reloads, not that other stuff) but my times are getting better. (For reloads, not that other stuff).

I pulled the extended slide lock lever from my G23 and swapped it with the G26 in an attempt to save my bruised thumb when hitting the slide release. I think that'll help a lot. Much faster than a slingshot slide release.

So, we'll see how it shapes up late on Monday night!!

AD
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
So far I've got at least 5 guys who said they'll run with their back up gun on Monday and a few more who are searching for a sidearm to borrow to run in BUG.

AD
All,

As it turns out, we had NINE shooters show up who were man enough to give it a try with their Back Up Guns. I finished 4th out of 9 in BUG and 19th out of 33 overall. Not bad considering there were several Expert and Masters ahead of us and they were NOT shooting back up guns!!

Anyway, for your amusement, here's me shooting against my "arch nemesis" in BUG. I actually beat him on this stage as the final target required two head shots to finish from the kneeling position at the barrel and he pulled them all left. He made some snarky comment about MY current shooting status, but the fact still remains, he got his butt handed to him by over 5 seconds on this stage.

And as usual, they screwed up the video when it was MY turn to shoot. Everybody else got the full run but mine stops just before I hit the ground to make the two heads shots on the final target.

AD (keep the snickering to a minimum)

Greg's Stage 2

Andy's Stage 2
 

whitewolf68

Army
Site Owner
nra
Army
Joined
October 7, 2011
Messages
1,662
Likes
12
I still do not tire of seeing your shooting matches. Thank you for posting them for us.

Someday, someday I will get into some shooting sports IF I ever get time on my hands from work.
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
I know what I forgot to mention. That entire stage was shot STRONG HAND ONLY which is why we looked perplexed from time to time after a reload. Had to get back to the strong hand instead of the normal freestyle shooting.

Thinking and shooting makes a big difference from just standing there and lobbing bullets at the center of the target.

AD
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
All,

This was a message posted up on the BrianEnos website. Very big on serious shooting and all things competition. I believe this guy sums up exactly what I've been trying to say:


Posted Today, 09:16 PM
Stumbled on your post... I've shot IDPA, USPSA, Multi-Gun and long range precision over the last 10 years. Also been a part time CCW instructor for several years. I'm very pro-IDPA for new shooters as well as those that are wanting to carry or have a gun for home defense. In my opinion the vast majority of gun owners are just that. They own the guns and maybe shoot them on a static range a few times a year. If I can push them into IDPA, it's a way for them to experience the disorganized/anxious feeling they get and see that their scores blow. This pushes them into being more than just gun owners, they become shooters and seek out additional training. Without the comparison to other shooters, that actually know what they are doing, the average gun owner could go their whole life thinking they were ready for a life threatening experience just because they had a gun.
So that being said, I use it as a tool for others to bring them to reality in terms of their skill level and I also enjoy shooting the matches. It's my belief that all competitive shooting is good training once you have the correctly gun handling skills down. If it gets you some more trigger time with your carry gun that's a bonus. I'll use my carry guns some times, but most the time I'm shooting the same M&P9L that I shoot in USPSA Production with all the same gear. But the biggest thing I think it does it makes you shoot and think, USPSA does the same thing. If you can't shoot and think you don't do either matches very well. The other thing it does is makes you more accurate and faster. There's no getting around the fact that speed and accuracy are tactics that are needed in a real life threatening situation.

Gentlemen, he hit the nail on the head when he stated: "it's a way for them to experience the disorganized/anxious feeling they get....."

Thanks for reading.

AD
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
We've got a guy who shoots on our Monday night squad on a reasonably frequent schedule. Nice guys, decent shot. Kind of a big, part Chinese looking guy. Lots of tattoo, saggy pants,, the hat, and pretty much the rest of "The Thug Life" all wrapped up in a neat package. At least his butt crack is covered, so he's got that going for him.

Anyway, during a small break while we were reloading he casually mentions that the main reason he likes to shoot in IDPA and especially on our squad is that we don't preach or tell him how to shoot. He wants to blast away and most of the time doesn't really care about the penalty calls.

His game is to shoot a running gun battle on every stage until he's out of ammo! When he does this, he is very fast and very entertaining for sure, especially when he goes "all gangsta" on the stage.

He can shoot as fast as he wants as long as he wants. Sometimes he even comes up with a good score! It is not unusual for him to expend 30-35 rounds on a stage with 5 targets. He just likes to blast them away.

More power to him. If he enjoys it, it is fine with me. He mentioned that some of the other squads don't especially appreciate his "style" when shooting. I said as long as it's safe, you can shoot the stages any way you want.

Where else can you shoot as fast as you want and get scored on it!!

AD
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
As an addendum to last week's shoot, he did mention to me, prior to the start of the final stage, that he was going to "knife" the closest target at the end. It was only 8 or 9 feet away around the last corner and he said he would be out of ammo at the time, so the knife was coming out to finish the last target. Obviously this is not IDPA legal, but it is a local match and he did notify me in advance, so I went along with it.

Damn if he doesn't pull the knife and throw it at the last target. Stuck him right in the neck area with it. Very impressive.

Like I said, he's an interesting guy to watch shoot and still be safe about it! Rarely cares about his scores after about the second stage, especially if he's messed one of them up. Good guy to know on down the line I'm sure.

He says it's the only real practice he gets and takes full advantage of it.

AD
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
A short note:

The mighty Glock 21 (45ACP) took the #1 spot on Monday night over the other four 45 class shooters. (and 29 other shooters!)

I don't want to mention any names, but this guy was running fine on Monday with no "Failure to Neutralize" or "Hit Non-Threat" penalties for the entire night.

AD (all steel targets fell on the first shot, of course)
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
All,

Well, they may be the worst videos ever shot as my "camera man" is either retarded or just can't figure out how to push a single button, but here's a sample from Monday night.

This was "Stage 3" of the night and it starts with two heads shot to the first two targets around the corner. Then finish the stage as you see the targets. The lady who is shooting in the first video was there for only the second time and all of us can already see improvement in her gun handling skills but her grip still needs work. Notice that after dumping a half dozen shots on that first steel, she wisely just took the penalty and moved on. Good call and she hit the next steel first shot out!


Next up is my riding buddy Jay and he has problems with the second steel!


And to end the boredom of this message, it's time for me. I took a "make up shot" at that swinger as I didn't see two holes in it as it slowed down. As it turns out I did hit it for "Down zero" so it was a wasted shot.


As you can see, we're not all speed demons running all over the course with "race guns" and expensive hardware. Get out there and shoot a match with a buddy. It's more fun when you can brag over your buddies until the next match!

AD (Why, yes. I did get both steels on the first shot)
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
All,

Well, this video is the "smoking gun" (pardon the pun) of figuring out why my buddy has been kicking my butt almost every week.

Kindly notice at the end of the stage, where I've cleared the sidearm and holstered. Watch what the guy on the timer is doing with his right hand!

He's tapping the timer against his holster and it's registering those taps as shots!!!!

He is SO BUSTED it's not funny. He then tells me how he beat me by 10 seconds or so on that stage.

Luckily it was just his plan to jerk me around as you'll notice he quickly shows the timer to the scorekeeper before starting his tapping routine.

Have the sound on and you'll hear the timer hitting against his holster!!

AD (we do have fun out there)

 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
All,

Well, it was ugly. Actually it was ugly and funny at the same time and these two short videos will show why.

Evidently one of the "more technical" shooters put this stage together to end night the for my squad. It may look like we're dancing for the Twinkle Toe Follies but the rules were as follows:

At signal engage all targets on one side while advancing with two shots each. Engage all targets on the other side while retreating. Do not pass the blue barrels. All reloads will be done while moving. At no time are you to stop for anything other than a malfunction, which you may repair without moving.

Normally this wouldn't be too bad as it would only require one reload. Except WE were shooting in the BUG division last night and we only get 6 rounds per magazine. Heck we even had one guy shooting a 5 shot revolver! Yes, it was ugly.

With very few exceptions almost everyone stopped somewhere in the stage. That's how hard it is to shoot and think at the same time. Luckily both Greg (my arch nemesis) and myself did not stop, so we had that going for us.

I had him beat on this stage until I completely missed target 4 and took the dreaded "Down 10-FTN" penalty. Arrrrrgh. I lost to him by two seconds.

Anyway, try not to laugh and if you think it's so easy, get some friends and try it on the clock.

AD

Greg's Stage 4

Andy's Stage 4
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
All,

Well, another Monday night shoot is in the bag and it looked a little bad for me. As my normal targets of opportunity were either missing in action or at work, I decided to go for accuracy and sacrifice a bit of speed. I had to do that as I had been practicing all week with the revolver and then just jumped back in with the semi-auto. Two different worlds for sure.

So, in spite of getting beat up by people I normally take care of rather easily, I now have to listen to the jeering from the gallery of how I suck, I'm washed up, feeble, how I need a box of Depends with my box of ammo, and things like that.

With that said, kindly note the PERFECT reload in this video after shot nine. I've got that going for me.

At least I shot the stage Down Zero.

AD (the feeble and befuddled old guy in the video.)


 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
A quick update from the Monday night match.

I took "Most Accurate" with a very nice "Down 7" for the night and also beat my former flying buddy. Woo-Hoo!

The next most accurate was at "Down 15" and he as a Master shooter. (Like really good.)

Yes, it was a good night for shooting.

AD (Glock 30, my EDC, was the sidearm of choice tonight)
 

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
Well, as an update to the last message, I was doing some testing of the "Field of Vision" on a new GoPro camera last night and got this particular video in the process.

Normally I just post up the run through the stage but for those of you who haven't seen how this works, here's what it looks like before and after the actual stage run. As you can see, it's nothing spectacular or difficult.

If you'll watch closely, the 8th and 9th shots are to a disappearing target through that window. If you didn't jump out of cover to engage it, you missed it completely and several guys did just that.

As usual, these guys rarely cut me any slack.

AD

 
Last edited:

ADulay

Member
nra
Army
airforce
nra instructor
Joined
January 10, 2012
Messages
841
Likes
33
Ah yes, the morning after.

Actually it's the morning after I kicked my buddies butt for the second week in a row. He is not a happy camper for sure, but I am!

On this stage you start seated and engage the three targets in "Tac Sequence" which means put one bullet in each before finishing the engagement on those targets.

The next two are taken "on the move" and then step on an activation plate to make the "drop turn" target display and then finally engage the last target from cover around the last corner.

The only thing I had to figure out was where to do a reload and not lose too much time. As it turned out I elected to do a "Tac Reload" (retain the magazine) after finishing the opening three target array BEFORE getting around the corner so that I could engage the remaining targets with a fully loaded sidearm. This worked out well as there was no need to reload before engaging the drop turn target.

This saved enough time for me to take out my nemesis by 3 seconds of raw time and 8 seconds of total time on the stage due to target penalties. I was "Down 1" while he was "Down 10" for the stage.

Advantage OLD GUY, thank you.

Notice just before I engage the final target that I kind of trip over something prior to shooting. It was the trip wire (appropriately named) that makes the drop turn target move. It's a cable and I moved into it before it got pulled away by the mechanism. Falling at that spot would have been expensive in time on the stage!

I may move slow, but most times accuracy covers speed when hiding.

AD (the mighty Glock 30, of course)